Ragnarök

Ragnarök, in the Norse mythology the twilight of the gods, when it was predicted “the Divine powers and the chaotic brute ones, after long contest and partial victory by the former, should meet at last in universal, world-embracing wrestle and duel, strength against strength, mutually extinctive, and ruin, 'twilight' sinking into darkness, shall swallow up the whole created universe, the old universe of the Norse gods”; in which catastrophe Vidar and another are to be spared to found a new heaven and a new earth, the sovereign of which shall be Justice. “Insight this,” says Carlyle, “of how, though all dies, and even gods die, yet all death is but a Phoenix fire-death, and new birth into the greater and the better as the fundamental law of being.”

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Ragman Roll * Ragusa
Radnorshire
Radowitz, Joseph von
Rae, John
Raeburn, Sir Henry
Raff, Joachim
Raffles, Sir Thomas Stamford
Rafn, Karl Christian
Ragged Schools
Raglan, Fitzroy Somerset, Lord
Ragman Roll
Ragnarök
Ragusa
Rahel
Raikes, Robert
Railway King
Rainy, Robert
Rajah
Rajmahal
Rajon, Paul Adolphe
Rajput
Rajputana

Nearby

Ragnarök in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable