Selden, John (15841654)

Selden, John, born at Salvington, Sussex; adopted law as a profession, and was trained at Clifford's Inn and the Inner Temple, London; successful as a lawyer, he yet found time for scholarly pursuits, and acquired a great reputation by the publication of various erudite works bearing on old English jurisprudence and antiquities generally; a “History of Tithes” (1618), in which he combats the idea that “tithes” are divinely instituted, got him into trouble with the Church; was imprisoned in 1621 for encouraging Parliament to repudiate James's absolutist claims; from his entrance into Parliament in 1623 continued to play an important part throughout the troublous reign of Charles; sincerely attached to the Parliamentary side, he was one of the framers of the Petition of Right, and suffered imprisonment with Holies and the others; sat in the Long Parliament, but, all through out of sympathy with the extremists, disapproved of the execution of Charles; held various offices, e. g. Keeper of the Rolls and Records in the Tower; continued to write learned and voluminous works on biblical and historical subjects, but is best remembered for his charming 'Table-talk, a book of which Coleridge remarked, “There is more weighty bullion sense in this book than I can find in the same number of pages of any uninspired writer” (15841654).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Selby * Selene
Seeley, Sir John Robert
Segovia
Segu
Seine
Seine
Seine-et-Marne
Seine-et-Oise
Seine-Inférieure
Selborne, Roundell Palmer, Earl of
Selby
Selden, John
Selene
Self-denying Ordinance
Selim I.
Seljuks
Selkirk
Selkirkshire
Selwyn, George
Selwyn, George Augustus
Semaphore
Semele