Shrewsbury

Shrewsbury, county town of Shropshire, situated on a small peninsula formed by a horse-shoe bend of the Severn, 42 m. W. by N. of Birmingham; three fine bridges span the river here, connecting it with several extensive suburbs; a picturesque old place with winding streets and quaint timber dwelling-houses, a Norman castle, abbey church, ruined walls, etc. The public school, founded by Edward VI., ranks amongst the best in England; figures often in history as a place where Parliament met in 1397-98, and in 1403 gave its name to the battle which resulted in the defeat of Hotspur and the Earl of Douglas by Henry IV.; it was taken by the Parliamentarians in 1644; chief industries are glass-painting, malting, and iron-founding.

Population (circa 1900) given as 27,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Shovel, Sir Cloudesley * Shropshire
Shittim Wood
Shoa
Shoddy
Shoeburyness
Sholapur
Shore, Jane
Shoreditch
Shoreham, New
Shorthouse, Joseph Henry
Shovel, Sir Cloudesley
Shrewsbury
Shropshire
Shrovetide
Shumla
Shylock
Siam
Siamese Twins
Sibbald, Sir Robert
Siberia
Sibyl
Sicilian Vespers

Nearby

Antique pictures of Shrewsbury

Links here from Chalmers

Adams, William
Arabella, Stuart
Barrow, Isaac
Belmeis, Richard De
Benbow, John
Biscoe, Richard
Blake, Thomas
Booth, Henry
Butler, Alban
Cavendish, Sia William
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