Silage

Silage, the name given to green fodder, vegetables, &c., stored in stacks or pits (or silos) under heavy pressure, the process being known as ensilage. The practice of thus preserving green crops for fodder dates from earliest times, but its general adoption in Britain only began in 1882 since when its spread has been rapid. Originally the process in vogue involved slight fermentation, resulting in “sour silage,” but in 1884 it was found that by delaying the application of pressure for a day or two a rise of temperature took place sufficiently great to destroy the bacteria producing fermentation, the result being “sweet silage.” Both kinds are readily eaten by cattle.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Sikkim * Silence, Worship of
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