Smith, James and Horace

Smith, James and Horace, authors of the famous parodies “The Rejected Addresses,” born at London: James, in business as a solicitor, and Horace, a wealthy stockbroker; both were occasional contributors to the periodical press before the public offer of a prize for the best poetical address to be spoken at the re-opening of Drury Lane Theatre prompted them to issue a series of “Rejected Addresses,” parodying the popular writers of the day—Wordsworth, Southey, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, &c.; intensely clever, these parodies have never been surpassed in their kind; Horace was also a busy writer of novels now forgotten, and also published two vols. of poetry; James subsequently wrote a number of Charles Mathews' “Entertainments” (James, 1775-1839; Horace, 1779-1849).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Smith, Goldwin * Smith, John
Sly, Christopher
Smart, Christopher
Smeaton, John
Smectymnuus
Smelfungus
Smiles, Samuel
Smith, Adam
Smith, Alexander
Smith, George
Smith, Goldwin
Smith, James and Horace
Smith, John
Smith, John
Smith, Sydney
Smith, Sir William
Smith, William Robertson
Smith, Sir William Sidney
Smithfield
Smithsonian Institution
Smoky City
Smolensk