Sonnet

Sonnet, a form of poetical composition invented in the 13th century, consisting of 14 decasyllabic or hendecasyllabic iambic lines, rhymed according to two well-established schemes which bear the names of their two most famous exponents, Shakespeare and Petrarch. The Shakespearian sonnet consists of three four-lined stanzas of alternate rhymes clinched by a concluding couplet; the Petrarchan of two parts, an octave, the first eight lines rhymed abbaabba, and a sestet, the concluding six lines arranged variously on a three-rhyme scheme.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Sonderbund * Sons of the Prophets
Somaliland
Somerset House
Somersetshire
Somerville, Mrs. Mary
Somme
Somnath
Somnath, Idol of
Somnus
Sonata
Sonderbund
Sonnet
Sons of the Prophets
Sontag, Henrietta
Soochoo
Sopherim, The
Sophia, Electress of Hanover
Sophia, St.
Sophie Charlotte
Sophists
Sophocles
Sorata

Nearby

Sonnet in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Asinari, Frederic