Sumptuary Laws

Sumptuary Laws, passed in various lands and ages to restrict excess in dress, food, and luxuries generally; are to be found in the codes of Solon, Julius Cæsar, and other ancient rulers; Charles VI. of France restricted dinners to one soup and two other dishes; appear at various times in English statutes down to the 16th century against the use of “costly meats,” furs, silks, &c., by those unable to afford them; were issued by the Scottish Parliament against the extravagance of ladies in the matter of dress to relieve “the puir gentlemen their husbands and fathers”; were repealed in England in the reign of James I.; at no time were they carefully observed.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Sumner, John Bird * Sumter, Fort
Sullivan's Island
Sully, Maximilien de Béthune, Duke of
Sully-Prudhomme
Sulpicius Severus
Sultan
Sulu Islands
Sumatra
Sumbawa
Sumner, Charles
Sumner, John Bird
Sumptuary Laws
Sumter, Fort
Sun, The
Sunda Islands
Sunderbunds
Sunderland
Sunderland, Charles Spencer, third Earl
Sunderland, Robert Spencer, second Earl of
Sunnites
Sun-Worship
Suonada