Synagogue, the Great

Synagogue, the Great, the name given to a council at Jerusalem, consisting of 120 members, there assembled about the year 410 B.C. to give final form to the service and worship of the Jewish Church. A Jewish tradition says Moses received the law from Sinai; he transmitted it to Joshua, Joshua to the elders, the elders to the prophets, to the men of the Great Assembly, who added thereto these words: “Be circumspect in judgment, make many disciples, and set a hedge about the law.” To them belong the final settlement and arrangement of the Jewish Scriptures, the introduction of a new alphabet, the regulation of the synagogue worship, and the adoption of sundry liturgical forms, as well as the establishment of the Feast of Purim (q.v.), and probably the “schools” of the Scribes.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Synagogue * Syncretism
Syllogism
Sylphs
Sylvester, St.
Sylvester, St.
Symbolism
Syme, James
Symonds, John Addington
Symphlagades
Symphony
Synagogue
Synagogue, the Great
Syncretism
Syndicate
Synergism
Synesius, Bishop Ptolemais
Synod
Synoptic Gospels
Syra
Syracuse
Syria
Syrianus