Taranto

Taranto, a fortified seaport of South Italy, situated on a rocky islet which lies between the Gulf of Taranto and the Mare Piccolo, a broad inlet on the E., 72 m. S. of Bari; is well built, and contains various interesting buildings, including a cathedral and castle; is connected with the mainland on the E. by a six-arched bridge, and by an ancient aqueduct on the W.; some textile manufactures are carried on, and oyster and mussel fisheries and fruit-growing are important; as the ancient Tarentum its history goes back to the time when it was the chief city of Magna Græcia; was captured by the Romans in 272 B.C., and after the fall of the Western Empire was successively in the hands of Goths, Lombards, and Saracens, and afterwards shared the fate of the kingdom of Naples, to which it was united in 1063.

Population (circa 1900) given as 25,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Taranaki * Tarapaca
Tannin
Tantalus
Tantia Topee
Taoism
Taormina
Tapajos
Tapley, Mark
Tapti
Tara, Hill Of
Taranaki
Taranto
Tarapaca
Tarare
Tarascon
Tarbes
Tare and Tret
Tarentum
Targums
Tarifa
Tarnopol
Tarnov