Tibet

Tibet, a country of Central Asia, and dependency of China since 1720, called by the natives themselves Bod or Bodyul, comprises a wide expanse of tableland, “three times the size of France, almost as cold as Siberia, most of it higher than Mount Blanc, and all of it, except a few valleys, destitute of population”; enclosed by the lofty ranges of the Himalaya and Kuen-lun Mountains, it has been left practically unexplored; possesses great mineral wealth, and a large foreign trade is carried on in woollen cloth (chief article of manufacture); polyandry and polygamy are prevailing customs among the people, who are a Mongolic race of fine physique, fond of music and dancing, jealous of intrusion and wrapt up in their own ways and customs; the government, civil and religious, is in the hands of the clergy, the lower orders of which are numerous throughout the country; a variation of Mongol Shamanism is the native religion, but Lamaism is the official religion of the country, and the supreme authority is vested in the Dalai Lama, the sovereign pontiff, who resides at Lhassa, the capital.

Population (circa 1900) given as 6,000,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Tibert, Sir * Tibullus, Albius
Thurles
Thurlow, Edward, Baron
Thursday
Thursday Island
Thurso
Thyrsus
Tian-Shan
Tiber
Tiberius
Tibert, Sir
Tibet
Tibullus, Albius
Tichborne
Ticino
Ticino
Tickell, Thomas
Ticknor, George
Ticonderoga
Tieck, Ludwig
Tientsin
Tierra del Fuego