Tyre

Tyre, a famous city of ancient Phoenicia (q.v.), about 30 m. N. of Acre; comprised two towns, one on the mainland, the other on an island opposite; besieged and captured in 332 B.C. by Alexander the Great, who connected the towns by a causeway, which, by silting sands, has grown into the present isthmus; its history goes back to the 10th century B.C., when it was held by Hiram, the friend of Solomon, and sustained sieges by Nebuchadnezzar and others; was reduced by Cæsar Augustus, but again rose to be one of the most flourishing cities of the East in the 4th century A.D.; fell into ruins under the Turks, and is now reduced to some 5000 of a population.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Tyrconnel, Richard Talbot, Earl of * Tyrol
Tyche
Tyler, Edward Burnet
Tyler, John
Tyler, Wat
Tyndal, John
Tyne
Tynemouth
Typhon
Tyrants
Tyrconnel, Richard Talbot, Earl of
Tyre
Tyrol
Tyrone
Tyrone, Hugh O'Neil, Earl of
Tyrrhenian Sea
Tyrtæus
Tyrwhitt, Thomas
Tytler, Patrick Fraser
Ucayali
Udall, Nicholas
Ueberweg, Friedrich

Nearby

Tyre in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Akiba
Alexander The Great
Apelles
Arius
Assemani, Joseph Simon
Cato, Marcus Portius
Eusebius
Frumentius, St.
Hanmer, Meredith
Meleager
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