Virgil

Virgil, great Latin poet, born near Mantua, author in succession of the “Eclogues,” the “Georgics,” and the “Æneid”; studied at Cremona and Milan, and at 16 was sent to Rome to study rhetoric and philosophy, lost a property he had in Cremona during the civil war, but recommended himself to Pollio, the governor, who introduced him to Augustus, and he went to settle in Rome; here, in 37 B.C., he published his “Eclogues,” a collection of 10 pastorals, and gained the patronage of Mæcenas, under whose favour he was able to retire to a villa at Naples, where in seven years he, in 30 B.C., produced the “Georgics,” in four books, on the art of husbandry, after which he devoted himself to his great work the “Æneid,” or the story of Æneas of Troy, an epic in 12 books, connecting the hero with the foundation of Rome, and especially with the Julian family, and which was finished in 19 B.C.; on his deathbed he expressed a wish that it should be burned, and left instructions to that effect in his will; he was one of the purest-minded poets perhaps that ever lived (70-19 B.C.).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Virchow, Rudolf * Virgin Islands
Villon, François
Vincennes
Vincent, St.
Vincent de Paul, St.
Vindhya Mountains
Vinegar Bible
Vinegar Hill
Vinet, Alexandre Rodolphe
Viotti, Giovanni Battista
Virchow, Rudolf
Virgil
Virgin Islands
Virgin Queen
Virginia
Virginia, West
Vishnu
Visigoths
Vistula
Vitalis, St.
Vitellius, Aulus
Vitruvius, Pollio

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Virgil in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable