Wolf, Friedrich August (17591824)

Wolf, Friedrich August, great classical scholar, born near Nordhausen; studied at Göttingen; was professor of Philology at Halle; became world-famous for his theory of the Homeric poems; he maintains, in his “Prolegomena ad Homerum,” that the “Iliad” and the “Odyssey” were originally a body of independent ballads handed down by oral tradition, and gradually collected into two groups, which finally appeared each as one, bearing the name of Homer, who, he allows, was probably the first to attempt to weave them severally into one; the “Prolegomena” was published in 1735, and its appearance caused a wide-spread sensation, and gave rise to a controversy which maintains itself to the present time (17591824).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Wolcot, John * Wolfe, Charles
Witsius, Hermann
Wittekind
Wittenberg
Wizard of the North
Woden
Wodrow, Robert
Woffington, Peg
Woiwode
Woking
Wolcot, John
Wolf, Friedrich August
Wolfe, Charles
Wolfe, James
Wolfenbüttel
Wolff, Johann Christian von
Wollaston, William
Wollaston, William Hyde
Wollstonecraft, Mary
Wolseley, Garnet Joseph, Lord
Wolsey, Thomas
Wolverhampton