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, of the same family with the preceding, born in 1504, at Bergamo, was the son of count Francis Albani, and

, of the same family with the preceding, born in 1504, at Bergamo, was the son of count Francis Albani, and intended by his father for the army, but preferred the study of the civil and canon law, in which, as well as in polite literature, he attained great eminence. At first, however, he bore arms in the Venetian army, and afterwards went into the church. Pope Pius V. was no sooner raised to that dignity, than he made Albani a cardinal, in 1570. It is even said that after the death of Gregory XIII. the conclave would have elected him pope, but he was then a widower and had children, a circumstance which interfered with their intentions. He died April 25, 1591. His principal works are: 1. “De Immunitate ecclesiarum,1553. 2. “De potestate Papæ et concilii,” Lyons, 1558; Venice, 1561, 4to. 3. “De Cardinalibus, et de douatione Constantini,1584, fol. Moreri gives an account of a lawyer of Bergamo, who wrote on these subjects, and is evidently the same person.

, a Dominican, born in 1504 at Miranda in Navarre, appeared with great distinction

, a Dominican, born in 1504 at Miranda in Navarre, appeared with great distinction at the council of Trent, where he composed a treatise on trie residence of bishops, which he held to be of divine right, treating the contrary opinion as diabolical. Philip II. king of Spain, having married queen Mary in 1554, took Carranza with him into England, who laboured to restore the Catholic religion there, and pleased Philip so much, that he appointed him archbishop of Toledo 1557. This illustrious prelate was, however, accused before the Inquisition, 1559, and carried as a heretic to Rome, where he was thrown into prison, and suffered greatly during ten years, notwithstanding the solicitations of his friend Navarre, who openly undertook his defence. At length the Inquisition declared by a sentence passed 1576, that there was not any certain proof that Carranza was a heretic. They condemned him nevertheless to abjure the errors which had been imputed to him, and confined him to la Minerve, a monastery of his order, where he died the same year, aged 72. His principal works are, 1. “Summary of the Councils” in Latin, 1681, 4to, which is valued. 2. “A Treatise on the residence of Bishops,1547, 4to. 3. “A Catechism” in Spanish, 1558, fol.; censured by the Inquisition in Spain, but justified at the council of Trent in 1563.

sixteenth century, one of the greatest masters of what Roman catholics call the spiritual life, was born in 1504, at Grenada. He was educated in the house of the marquis

, a celebrated Dominican in the sixteenth century, one of the greatest masters of what Roman catholics call the spiritual life, was born in 1504, at Grenada. He was educated in the house of the marquis de Mondejar, and acquired great reputation by his piety, preaching, and writings. The kings of Portugal and Castile had a particular esteem for him, and would have raised him to the highest ecclesiastical dignities, but he persisted in refusing their offers. He died December 31, 1588. His works have been translated into French by Mr. Girard, in 2 vols. folio, and 10 vols. 8vo. They are said to be written with uncommon eloquence of style, and contain solid instruction. The principal are, “The Sinner’s Guide,” 1 vol. the “Memorial of the Christian Life,” with the supplement, 3 vols. a “Treatise on Prayer,” 2 vols. an excellent “Catechism,” 4 vols. the edition of 1709 is more complete than the preceding ones. “Instructions for Preachers,'' 8vo, a treatise on the duties of bishops;” Sermons," 6 vols. 8vo, Antwerp, 1604, in Latin the Life of the Holy Priest, Avila, &C.