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Admiral

,

corruption of Amir-al. Milton, speaking of Satan, says:—

“His spear (to equal which the tallest pine

Hewn on Norwegian hills, to be the mast

Of some tall amiral, were but a wand)

He walked with.”—Paradise Lost, i. 292.

The word was introduced by the Turks or Genoese in the twelfth century, and is the Arabic Amir with the article al (lord or commander); as Amir-al-ma (commander of the water), Amir-al-Omra (commander of the forces), Amir-al-Mūminim (commander of the faithful).

English admirals used to be of three classes, according to the colour of their flag

Admiral of the Red, used to hold the centre in an engagement.

Admiral of the White, used to hold the van.

Admiral of the Blue, used to hold the rear.

The distinction was abolished in 1864; now all admirals carry the white flag.

Admirals are called Flag Officers.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Ad hab-al-Cabr
Adiaphorists
Adieu
Adissechen
Adjective Colours
Adjourn
Adjournment of the House
Admirable (The)
Admirable Crichton (The)
Admirable Doctor (Doctor admirdbilis)
Admiral
Admiral of the Blue
Admiral of the Red
Admittance
Admonitionists or Admonitioners
Adolpha
Adonai
Adonais
Adonies
Adonis
Adonis of 50

Linking here:

Amiral
Flag-officer
Flag-ship

See Also:

Admiral