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Æneʹid

.

The epic poem of Virgil, (in twelve books). So called from Æneʹas and the suffix -is, plur. idĕs (belonging to).

“The story of Sinon,” says Macrõbius, “and the taking of Troy is borrowed from Pisander


“The loves of Dido and Ænēas are taken from those of Medēa and Jason, in Apollõnius of Rhodes.


“The story of the Wooden Horse and burning of Troy is from Arctinus of Milētus.”

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Ægeus
Æginetan Sculptures
Ægir
Ægis
Ægrotat
A E I (A—i)
Ælurus
Æmilian Law
Æmonia Æmonian
Æneas
Æneid
Æolic Digamma
Æolic Mode
Æolus
Æon (Greek, aion)
Æra
Aèrated Bread
Aërated Water
Aerians
Æschylus (Greek, Aισχνλoζ)
Æschylus of France

See Also:

Æ`neid