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Alexanʹdrines (4 syl.)

.

Iambic verses of 12 or 13 syllables, divided into two parts between the sixth and seventh syllable; so called because they were first employed in a metrical romance of Alexander the Great, commenced by Lambert-li-Cors, and continued by Alexandre de Bernay, also called Alexandre de Paris. The final line of the Spenserian stanza is an Alexandrine.

“A needless Alexandrine ends the song,

Which, like a wounded snake, I drags its slow length along.”


Pope: Essay on Criticism, Part ii., lines 356–7.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Alexander the Corrector
Alexander’s Beard
Alexandra (in Orlando Furioso)
Alexandra
Alexandrian
Alexandrian Codex
Alexandrian Library
Alexandrian School
Alexandrine Age
Alexandrine Philosophy
Alexandrines
Alexandrite
Alexis (St.)
Alfader (father of all)
Alfana
Alfar
Alfheim (home of the good genii)
Alfonsin
Alfonsine Tables
Alfonso
Alfonso XI.

See Also:

Alexandrines