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Ben Jocʹhananʹ

,

in the satire of Absalom and Achitophel, by Dryden and Tate, is meant for the Rev. Samuel Johnson, who suffered much persecution for his defence of the right of private judgment.

“A Jew [Englishman] of humble parentage was he;

By trade a Levite [clergyman], though of low degree.”


Part ii. 354, 355.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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