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Bos[ei] in lingua

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He is bribed to silence; he has a coin (marked with a bull’s head) on his tongue. Adalardus, in Statutis Abbatiœ Corbeiensis (bk. i. c. 8), seems to refer to the bos as a coin. “Boves et reliquam pecuniam habeat … unde et ipse et omnis familia ejus vivere possit” (i.e. plenty of gold and silver …). Plautus, however, distinctly says (Persa, ii. 5, 16), “Boves bini hic sunt in crumēna” (Two bulls in a purse.) The Greeks had the phrase, βoνζ επι γλωτγηζ Servius tells us that even the Romans had a coin with a bull stamped on it. (See Pliny, 18, 3.) Presuming that there was no such coin, there cannot be a doubt that the word Bos was used as the equivalent of the price of an ox.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Born Days
Born in the Purple (a translation of porphyrogenitus)
Born with a Silver Spoon
Borough English
Borowe
Borr
Borrow
Borrowed days of February (The)
Borrowed days of March
Bortell
Bos[ei] in lingua
Bosh
Bosky
Bosom Friend (A)
Bosom Sermons
Bosphorus=Ox ford
Boss
Bossum
Bostal
Botanomancy
Botany