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Chaonʹian Food

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Acorns. So called from the oak trees of Chaonia or Dodona. Some think beech-mast is meant, and tell us that the bells of the oracle were hung on beech-trees, not on oaks.

⁂ The Greek word is φηγoζ; Latin, fagus. Hence Strabo, Δωδωνην, φηγóν τεΠελασγων εδρανoν ηκεν (He to Dodona came, and the hallowed oak or beech [fagus], the seat of the Pelasgi.) Now, “fagus” means the food-tree, and both acorns and mast are food, so nothing determinate can be derived from going to the root of the word, and, as it is extremely doubtful where Dodona was, we get no light by referring to the locality. Our text says Chaonia (in Epīrus), others place it in Thessaly.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Chancellor of England (The)
Chancellor of the Exchequer (The)
Chancery
Chaneph
Change
Changeling
Chant du Depart
Chantage
Chanticleer
Chaonian Bird (The)
Chaonian Food
Chaos (kaos)
Chap
Chap-book (A)
Chapeau or Chapel de Roses
Chapeau-bras
Chapel
Chapel
Chapel-of-Ease
Chaperon
Chapter