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Christmas Box

.

A small gratuity given to servants, etc., on Boxing Day (the day after Christmas Day). In the early days of Christianity boxes were placed in churches for promiscuous charities, and opened on Christmas Day. The contents were distributed next day by the priests, and called the “dole of the Christmas box,” or the “box money.” It was customary for heads of houses to give small sums of money to their subordinates “to put into the box” before mass on Christmas Day.

Somewhat later, apprentices carried a box round to their master’s customers for small gratuities. The custom since 1836 has been gradually dying out.

“Gladly the boy, with Christmas-box in hand,

Throughout the town his devious route pursues,

And of his master’s customers implores

The yearly mite.”


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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Chriss-cross Row (row to rhyme with low)
Chrisom or Chrism
Christabel [Kristabel]
Christabelle [Kristabel]
Christendom [Kris-en-dum]
Christian [ch = k]
Christian Traditions
Christiana [ch = k]
Christmas (Kristmas)
Christmas
Christmas Box
Christmas Carols
Christmas Day
Christmas Decorations
Christmas Trees and Maypoles
Christolytes [Kris-to-lites]
Christopher (St.)
Chronicle Small Beer (To)
Chronicon ex Chronicis
Chronon-hoton-thologos [ch = k]
Chrysalis [ch = k]

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Boxing-Day