- skip - Brewer’s

Clerʹical Titles

.

(1) Clerk. As in ancient times the clergyman was about the only person who could write and read, the word clerical, as used in “clerical error,” came to signify an orthographical error. As the respondent in church was able to read, he received the name of clerk, and the assistants in writing, etc., are so termed in business. (Latin, clerʹicus, a clergyman.)

(2) Curate. One who has the cure of souls. As the cure of the parish used to be virtually entrusted to the clerical stipendiary, the word curate was appropriated to this assistant.

(3) Rector. One who has the parsonage and great tithes. The man who rules or guides the parish. (Latin, “a ruler.”)

(4) Vicar. One who does the “duty” of a parish for the person who receives the tithes. (Latin, vicarius, a deputy.)

(5) Incumbent and Perpetual Curate are now termed Vicars. (See Parsons.)

⁂ The French curé equals our vicar, and their vicaire our curate.

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Clelie
Clement (St.)
Clementina (The Lady)
Clench and Clinch
Cleombrotos
Cleon
Cleopatra
Cleopatra and her Pearl
Clergy
Clergymen
Clerical Titles
Clerical Vestments
Clerimond
Clerk
Clerk-ale and Church-ale
Clerkenwell (London)
Clerkly
Client
Clifford (Paul)
Climacteric
Climacteric Years

Linking here:

Clerk
Curate
Parson
Rector