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Cockade

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The men-servants of the military wear a small black cockade on their hat, the Hanoverian badge. The Stuart cockade was white. At the battle of Sherra-Muir, in the reign of George I., the English soldiers wore a black rosette in their hats. In the song of Sherra-Muir the English soldiers are called “the red-coat lads wiʹ black cockades.” (French, cocarde; German, kokarde.)

In the British Army and Navy the cockade, since the Hanoverian accession, has been black.

Austrian cockade is black and yellow. All sentry boxes and boundary posts are so painted. Ein schwarz-gelber was the nickname of an Austrian Imperialist in 1848.

Bavaria, light blue and white are the royal colours.

Belgium, black, yellow, and red.

France (regal), the royal colour was white.

Hanover, the cockade was black. Black enters into all the German cockades.

Prussia, black and white are the royal colours.

Russia, green and white are the royal colours.

To mount the cockade. To become a soldier. From time immemorial the partisans of different leaders have adopted some emblem to show their party; in 1767 an authoritative regulation determined that every French soldier should wear a white cockade, and in 1782 the badge was restricted to the military. The phrase given above is common both to England and France.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Cock-fighting
Cock-horse
Cock Lane Ghost
Cock-pit
Cock Sure
Cock the Ears (To)
Cock the Nose
Cock up your Head [foot, etc.]
Cock your Eye (To)
Cock your Hat (To)
Cockade
Cockaigne (Land of)
Cockatrice
Cocked Hat (A)
Cocked-hat Club (The)
Cocker
Cockie or Cocky
Cockle Hat
Cockle Shells
Cockles
Cockles of the Heart