- skip - Brewer’s

Corcēca [Blind-heart]

.

Superstition is so named in Spenser’s Faërie Queene. Abessa tried to make her understand that danger was at hand, but, being blind, she was dull of comprehension. At length she was induced to shut her door, and when Una knocked would give no answer. Then the lion broke down the door, and both entered. The meaning is that England, the lion, broke down the door of Superstition at the Reformation. Corcēca means Romanism in England. (Book i. 3.)

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Copyhold Estate
Copyright
Coq-à-lâne
Corah
Coral Beads
Coral Master
Coram Judice (Latin)
Coranach
Corbant
Corbeaux
Corcēca [Blind-heart]
Corcyrean Sedition (The)
Cordelia
Cordelia’s Gift
Cordeliers
Cordeliers (The)
Cordon (The)
Cordon (Un grand)
Cordon Bleu (Un) (French)
Cordon Noir (Un)
Cordon Rouge (Un) (French)