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Cradle-land

.

The same as “borough English,” under which lands descend to the youngest son. By Gavelkind, land passes to all sons in equal proportions.

If the father has no son, then (in cradle-land tenures) the youngest daughter is sole heiress. If neither wife, son, nor daughter, the youngest brother inherits; if no brother, the youngest sister is heir; if neither brother nor yet sister, then the youngest next of kin.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Crab-cart
Crack
Crack-brained
Crack a Bottle
Crack a Crib (To)
Crack Up a Person (To)
Cracked
Cracked Pipkins
Cracker
Cracknells (from the French craquelin)
Cradle-land
Craft (A)
Craft (A)
Craft
Craigmillar Castle
Crakys of War
Cram
Crambe bis Cocta [“cabbage boiled twice”]
Crambo
Crampart (King)
Cramp-ring