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Cravatʹ

.

A corruption of Crabat or Croät. It was introduced into France by some French officers on their return from Germany in 1636. The Croäts, who guarded the Turkish frontiers of Austria, and acted as scouts on the flanks of the army, wore linen round their necks, tied in front, and the officers wore muslin or silk. When France organised a regiment on the model of the Croäts, these linen neckcloths were imitated, and the regiment was called “The Royal Cravat.”

The Bonny Cravat. A public-house sign at Woodchurch, Kent; a corruption of La bonne corvette. Woodchurch was noted for its smuggling proclivities, and the “Bonnie Cravat” was a smuggler’s hostelry.

To wear a hempen cravat. To be hanged.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Cram
Crambe bis Cocta [“cabbage boiled twice”]
Crambo
Crampart (King)
Cramp-ring
Crane
Crank
Crannock
Crapaud or Johnny Crapaud
Crape … . Lawn
Cravat
Craven
Crawley
Crayon (Geoffrey)
Creaking Doors hang the Longest
Create. Make
Creature (The)
Creature-comforts
Credat Judæus or Credat Judæus Apella
Credence Table
Crédit Fonoier (French)