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Delʹuge

.

After me the Deluge [“Après moi le Déluge”]. When I am dead the deluge may come for aught I care. Generally ascribed to Prince Metternich, but the Prince borrowed it from Mme. Pompadour, who laughed off all the remonstrances of ministers at her extravagance by saying, “Après nous le déluge” (Ruin, if you like, when we are dead and gone).

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Delia
Delias
Delight
Delirium
Della Cruscans or Della Cruscan School
Delmonico
Delos
Delphi or Delphos
Delphin Classics
Delta
Deluge
Deluges
Demerit
Demijohn (A)
Demi-monde
Demi-rep
Demiurge
Demobilisation of troops
Democracy
Democritos
Demodocos

See Also:

Deluge