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Doyleys

.

Now means a small cloth used to cover dessert plates; but originally it had a much wider meaning. Thus Dryden speaks of “doyley petticoats;” and Steele, in No. 102 of the Tatler, speaks of his “doiley suit.” The Doyleys were linen-drapers, No. 346, east corner of Upper Wellington Street, Strand, from the time of Queen Anne to the year 1850.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Downpour (A)
Downright
Downright Dunstable
Downstairs
Downy (The)
Downy Cove (A)
Dowsabell
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Doxy
Doyleys
Dozen
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Draft on Aldgate (A)
Drag in, Neck and Crop
Draggle-tail
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