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Dry Rot

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The spontaneous rot of timber or wall-paper, not unfrequently produced by certain fungi attaching themselves thereto. It is called dry rot because the wood is not purposely exposed to wet, although, without doubt, damp from defective ventilation is largely present, and the greenness of wood employed contributes greatly to the decay.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Drunkenness
Drunkenness
Drupner [the dripper]
Drury Lane (London)
Druses
Dry
Dry Blow (A)
Dry Goods (in merchandise)
Dry Lodgings
Dry-nurse
Dry Rot
Dry Sea (A)
Dry Shave (A)
Dry Style (of writing)
Dry Wine
Dryads
Dryasdust (Rev. Dr.)
Dualism
Dub
Dub Up!
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