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Earl

(Anglo-Saxon, eorl, a man of position, in opposition to ceorl, a churl, or freeman of the lowest rank; Danish, jarl). William the Conqueror tried to introduce the word Count, but did not succeed, although the wife of an earl is still called a countess.        

“The sheriff is called in Latin vice-comes, as being the deputy of the earl or comés, to whom the custody of the shire is said to have been committed.”—Blackstone: Commentaries, book i. chap. ix. p. 339.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Eagle
Eagle
Eagle-stones
Ear. (Anglo-Saxon, eáre.)
Ear-finger
Ear-marked
Ear-shot
Ears
Ears to ear Bible (The)
Earing
Earl
Earl of Mar’s Grey Breeks
Early to Bed
Earth
Earthmen (The)
Earthquakes
Earwig
Ease
Ease (Chapel of)
Ease Her!
East

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Earl