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Episeʹmon

,

in Greek numerals, is a sign standing for a numeral. Thus, ἐπισημον βαὗ, generally called Fau. Episēmon, stands for 6, and iota-episemon for 16. There are two other symbols—viz. koppa for 90, and sampi [san-pi] for 900. The reason is this: The Greek letters were used for numerals, and were ranged in three columns of nine figures each; but 24 letters will not divide by 9, so the 3 symbols, episēmon, koppa, and sampi were added to make up 3 x 9. Col. 1, from 1 to 20; col. 2, from 20 to 100; col. 3, from 100 to 1,000.

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Bau and Fau are identical, the B or F being the dijamma. Thus οἶνος (wine) was pronounced Foinos, called in Latin Vinum, and ώον (an egg) was pronounced Ofon, in Latin Ovum.

A dash under a letter multiplied it a hundredfold. Thus, α = 1, but α̱ = 1000. For intermediate figures between full tens a mark was made above the unit. Thus ι (iota) = 10; but ιά = 10 + 1 = 11, ιβ́ = 10 + 2 = 12; ιγ́ = 10 + 3 = 13, and so on.

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Ephori or Ephors
Epic
Epicure
Epicurean
Epicuros. (Latin form, Epicurus.)
Epi-demic
Epigram
Epilepsy
Epimenides
Epiphany
Episemon
Episode
Epistle
Epi-zootic
Epoch
Epode
Epsom Races
Epsom Salts
Equal-to
Equation of Time
Eques Auratus

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Koppa
Numerals
Sampi