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Esoterʹic (Greek, those within)

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Exoterʹic, those without. The term originated with Pythagʹoras, who stood behind a curtain when he gave his lectures. Those who were allowed to attend the lectures, but not to see his face, he called his exoteric disciples; but those who were allowed to enter the veil, his esoteric.

Aristotle adopted the same terms, though he did not lecture behind a curtain. He called those who attended his evening lectures, which were of a popular character, his exoterics; and those who attended his more abstruse morning lectures, his esoterics.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Erythreos
Erythynus
Escapade
Esclandre
Escuage
Esculapios (Latin, Esculapius)
Escurial
Escutcheon of Pretence (An)
Esingæ
Esmond (Henry)
Esoteric (Greek, those within)
Espiet (Es-pe-a)
Esplandian
Esprit de Corps
Esprit Follet
Esquire
Essays
Essenes
Essex
Essex Lions
Essex Stile

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Exoteric

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Esoteric