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Fly (plural flys)

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A hackney coach, a cab. A contraction of Fly-by-night, as sedan chairs on wheels used to be called in the regency. These “Fly-by-nights,” patronised greatly by George, Prince of Wales, and his boon companions, during their wild night pranks at Brighton, were invented 1809 by John Butcher, a carpenter of Jew Street.

“In the morning we took a fly, an English term for an exceedingly sluggish vehicle, and drove up to the Minister’s.”—Hawthorne: Our Old House (Pilgrimage to Old Boston, p. 171).

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Flummery
Flummux (To)
Flummuxed
Flunkey
Flur
Flush (A)
Flush of Money
Flute
Flutter
Flutter the Devecotes (To)
Fly (plural flys)
Fly (plural flies)
Fly-boy
Fly a Kite (To)
Fly-by-night (A)
Fly in One’s Face (To)
Fly in the Face of Danger (To)
Fly in the Face of Providence (To)
Fly Open (To)
Fly Out at (To)
Flying Colours (To come off with)

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Flies
Fly-by-night (A)