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Giants (g soft)

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(1) Of Greek mythology, sons of Tarʹtaros and Ge. When they attempted to storm heaven, they were hurled to earth by the aid of Hercules, and buried under Mount Etna.

(2) Of Scandinavian mythology, were evil genii, dwelling in Jötunheim (giantland), who had the power of reducing or extending their stature at will.

(3) Of nursery mythology, are cannibals of vast stature and immense muscular power, but as stupid as they are violent and treacherous. The best known are Blunderbore (q.v.), Cormoranʹ (q.v.), Galliantus (q.v.), Gombo (q.v.), Megadore and Bellygan.

(4) In the romance of Garganʹtua and Pantagruel, by Rabelais, giants mean princes.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Ghebers or Guebres
Ghibelline (g hard)
Ghost
Ghoul
Giaffir (Djaf-fir)
Giall
Giallar Bridge
Giallar Horn (The)
Gian ben Gian (g soft)
Giant of Literature (The)
Giants (g soft)
(5) Giants of Mythology
(6) Giants of Real Life
Giant’s Causeway
Giants Dance (The)
Giant’s Leap (The)
Giants War with Jove (The)
Giaour (jow-er)
Gib (g soft)
Gib Cat
Gibberish (g hard)

Linking here:

Ascapart
Blunderbore
Cottys
Coulin
Goliath
Grantorto
Grim (Giant)
Hundred-handed (The)
Hymer
Junner
Otos
Polybotes
Porphyrion
Titan’s War with Jove (The)
Tityos
Tregeagle
Typhœus
Typhon

See Also:

Giants