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Glass Houses

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Those who live in glass houses should not throw stones. When, on the union of the two crowns, London was inundated with Scotchmen, Buckingham was a chief instigator of the movement against them, and parties used nightly to go about breaking their windows. In retaliation, a party of Scotchmen smashed the windows of the Duke’s mansion, which stood in St. Martin’s Fields, and had so many windows that it went by the name of the “Glass-house.” The court favourite appealed to the king, and the British Solomon replied, “Steenie, Steenie, those wha live in glass housen should be carefuʹ how they fling stanes.”

⁂ This was not an original remark of the English Solomon, but only the application of an existing proverb: “El que tiene tejados de vidro, no tire piedras al de su vezino.” (Nunez de Guzman: Proverbios.) (See also Chaucer’s Troylus, ii.)

Qui a sa maison de verre,

Sur le voisin ne jette pierre.”


Proverbes en Rimes (1664).

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Gjallar
Glacis
Gladsheim [Home of joy]
Gladstone Bag (A)
Glamorgan
Glasgow Arms
Glasgow Magistrate (A)
Glass
Glass Breaker (A)
Glass-eye
Glass Houses
Glass Slipper (of Cinderella)
Glasse (Mrs. Hannah)
Glassite (A)
Glastonbury
Glaswegian
Glauber Salts
Glaucus (of Bœotia)
Glaucus (Another)
Glaucus Swop (A)
Glaymore