- skip - Brewer’s

Jeremiah

,

derived from “Cucumber.” The joke is this: King Jeremiah = Jereʹ-king, contracted in Jerʹ-kinʹ, or gher-kin, and gherkin is a young cucumber.

The British Jeremiah. Gibbon so calls Gildas, author of Lamentations over the Destruction of Britain (516–570).

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Jemmy Jessamy (A)
Jenkinson (Ephraim)
Jennet
Jenny
Jenny lOuvrière
Jenny Wren
Jeofail, i.e. Jai failli (Lapsus sum; I have failed)
Jeopardy
Jereed
Jeremiad
Jeremiah
Jeremy Diddler
Jeremy Twitcher
Jericho
Jerked [beef]
Jerkin
Jeroboam of Rum or Claret (A)
Jerome (St.)
Jeronimo
Jerry-built
Jerry-shop, or a Tom and Jerry Shop

See Also:

Jeremiah