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Lady

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A woman of wealth, of station, or of rank. Verstegan says, “It was anciently written Hleafdian [? hlæfdige], contracted first into Lafdy, and then into Lady. Laf or Hláf (loaf) means food in general or bread in particular, and dig-ian or dug-an, to help, serve, or care for; whence lady means the ‘bread-server.ʹ The lord (or loaf-ward) supplied the food, and the lady saw that it was properly served, for the ladies used to carve and distribute the food to the guests.”

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Another etymology is Hlàf-weardie and loafward ie, where ie stands for a female suffix like -ina -ine; as Carolus, female Carol-ina, or Carol-ine; Joseph, Joseph-ina or Joseph-ine; Czar, Czar-ina, etc. etc.

Ladies retire to the drawing-room after dinner, and leave the gentlemen behind. This custom was brought in by the Norsemen. The Vikings always dismissed all women from their drinking parties. (S. Bunbury.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Lachesis [Lak-ĕ-sis]
Lackadaisical
Laconic
Lacustrine Deposits
Lacustrine Habitations
Lad o Wax
Ladas
Ladies
Ladon
Ladrones
Lady
Ladybird, Ladyfly, Ladycow
Lady Bountiful
Lady Chapel
Lady Day
Lady Isabella
Lady Magistrate
Lady Margaret Professor
Lady in the Sacque
Lady of England
Lady of Mercy (Our)

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