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Lanternise

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Spending one’s time in learned trifles; darkening counsel by words; mystifying the more by attempting to unravel mysteries; putting truths into a lantern through which, at best, we see but darkly. When monks bring their hoods over their faces “to meditate,” they are said by the French to lanternise, because they look like the tops of lanterns; but the result of their meditations is that of a “brown study,” or “fog of sleepy thought.” (See above.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Langbourn Ward (London)
Langstaff (Launcelot)
Language
Langue dOc
Langue dOil
Languish (Lydia)
Lantern
Lantern Jaws
Lantern-Land
Lanterns
Lanternise
Laocoon [La-ok-o-on]
Laodamia
Laodicean
Lapet (Mons.)
Lapithæ
Lapping Water
Laprel
Lapsus Linguæ (Latin)
Laputa
Lapwing (The)