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Laugh in One’s Sleeve (To)

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The French is: “Rire sous cape,” or “Rire sous son bonnet.” The German is: “Ins faüstchen lachen.” The Latin is: “In stomacho ridēre.” These expressions indicate secret derision; laughing at one, not with one. But such phrases as “In sinu gaudēre” mean to feel secret joy, to rejoice in one’s heart of hearts.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Lateran
Lath or Lathe
Lather
Latin
Latin Learning
Latinus
Latitudinarians
Latona
Latria and Dulia
Lattice or Chequers
Laugh in One’s Sleeve (To)
Laugh on the Other Side of Your Mouth
Laughing Philosopher
Laughing-stock
Laughter
Launce
Launcelet
Launched into Eternity
Launfal (Sir)
Laura
Lauras. (Greek, laura.)