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Maʹgi (The)

,

according to one tradition, were Melʹchior, Gaspar, and Balthazar, three kings of the East. The first offered gold, the emblem of royalty, to the infant Jesus; the second, frankincense, in token of divinity; and the third, myrrh, in prophetic allusion to the persecution unto death which awaited the “Man of Sorrows.”

Melchior means “king of light.”

Gaspar, or Caspar, means “the white one.”

Balthazar means “the lord of treasures.”

(Klopstock, in his Messiah, book v., gives these five names: Hadad, Selima, Zimri, Beled, and Sunith.)

Magi, in Camoensʹ Lusiad, means the Indian “Brahmins.” Ammiaʹnus Marcelliʹnus says that the Persian magi derivèd their knowledge from the Brahmins of India (i. 23); and Ariaʹnus expressly calls the Brahmins “magi” (i.7.).

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Mæviad
Mag
Maga
Magalona
Magazine
Magdalene
Magdeburg Centuries
Magellan
Magenta
Maggot, Maggoty
Magi (The)
Magic Garters
Magic Rings
Magic Wand
Magician
Magliabecchi
Magna Charta
Magnalia Christi
Magnanimous (The)
Magnano
Magnet

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Wise Men of the East

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Magi