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Mars

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Under this planet “is borne theves and robbers . . nyght walkers and quarell pykers, bosters, mockers, and skoffers; and these men of Mars causeth warre, and murther, and batayle. They wyll be gladly smythes or workers of yron . lyers, gret swerers… . He is red and angry . . a great walker, and a maker of swordes and knyves, and a sheder of mannes blode … and good to be a barboure and a blode letter, and to drawe tethe.” (Compost of Ptholomeus.)

Mars, in Camoën’s Lusiad, is “divine fortitude” personified. As Bacchus, the evil demon, is the guardian power of Mahometanism: so Mars or divine fortitude is the guardian power of Christianity.

The Mars of Portugal. Alfonso de Albuquerque, Viceroy of India. (1452–1515.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Marriages of Men of Genius
Married Women
Marrow (Scotch)
Marrow-bones
Marrow Controversy (The)
Marrow-men
Marry!
Marry Come Up!
Mar’s Year
Mars
Mars
Marseillaise
Marseilles Good Bishop
Marsh [Le Marais]
Marshal
Marsham (Men of)
Marsiglio or Marsilius
Marsyas
Martano (in Orlando Furioso)
Marteau des Heretiques
Martel

See Also:

Mars