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Masaniello

A corruption of TomMASo ANIELLO, a Neapolitan fisherman, who led the revolt of July, 1647. The great grievance was a new tax upon fruit, and the immediate cause of Masaniello’s interference was the seizure of his wife (or deaf and dumb sister) for having in her possession some contraband flour. Having surrounded himself with 150,000 men, women, and boys, he was elected chief of Naples, and for nine days ruled with absolute control. The Spanish viceroy flattered him, and this so turned his head that he acted like a maniac. The people betraved him, he was shot, and his body flung into a ditch, but next day it was interred with a pomp and ceremony never equalled in Naples (1647).

Auber has an opera on this subject called La Muette de Portici (1828).

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Marys
Mary Anne or Marianne
Mary Anne Associations
Mary Magdalene (St.)
Mary Queen of Scots
Marybuds
Marygold or Marigold
Maryland
Marylebone
Mas (plural, Masse)
Masaniello
Masche-croute [gnaw-crust]
Mascotte
Masdeu (Catalan for God’s field)
Masetto
Mashackering and Misguggling
Masher
Mask a Fleet (To)
Mason and Dixon’s Line
Mass
Mass (The)

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Masaniello