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Merʹcury

.

Images of Mercury, or rather, shapeless posts with a marble head of Mercury on them, used to be erected by the Greeks and Romans where two or more roads met, to point out the way. (Juvenal, viii. 53.)

⁂ There are two famous statues of this god in Paris: one in the garden of Versailles, by Lerambert, and another in the Tuileries, by Mellana.

You cannot make a Mercury of every log. Pythagoras said: “Non ex quovis ligno Mercurius fit.” That is, “Not every mind will answer equally well to be trained into a scholar.” The proper wood for a statue of Mercury was boxwood—“vel quod hominis pultorem prœ se ferat, vel quod materies sit omnium maxime œterna.” (Erasmus.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Meo Periculo (Latin)
Mephibosheth
Mephistopheles, Mephistophilis, Mephostophilus
Mercador Amante
Mercator’s Projection is Mercator’s chart or map for nautical purposes
Merchant of Venice
Mercia
Mercurial
Mercurial Finger (The)
Mercuriale
Mercury
Mercury
Mercury Fig
Mercutio
Mercy
Meredith (Owen)
Meridian (A)
Merino Sheep
Merioneth
Merian (French)
Merlin

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Planets

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Mercury