- skip - Brewer’s

Misereʹre (4 syl.)

.

Our fifty-first psalm is so called. One of the evening services of Lent is called misereʹre, because this penitential psalm is sung, after which a sermon is delivered. The under side of a folding-seat in choir-stalls is called a misereʹre; when turned up it forms a ledge-seat sufficient to rest the aged in a kneeling position.

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Miramont
Miranda
Mirror of Human Salvation
Mirror of King Ryence (The)
Mirror of Knighthood (The)
Mirrors
Mirza
Miscreant
Mise-money
Misers
Miserere
“Misfortune will never Leave Me till I Leave It,”
Mishna
Misnomers
Misprision
Miss, Mistress, Mrs
Miss is as Good as a Mile (A)
Missing Link (The)
Mississippi Bubble
Mistletoe
Mistletoe Bough

See Also:

Miserere