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Musʹcadins of Paris

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French dudes or exquisites, who aped the London mashers in the first French Revolution. Their dress was top-boots with thick soles, knee-breeches, a dress-coat with long tails, and a high stiff collar, and a thick cudgel called a constitution. It was thought to be John Bullish to assume a huskiness of voice, a discourtesy of manners, and a swaggering vulgarity of speech and behaviour. Probably so called from being “perfumed like a popinjay.”

“Cockneys of London, Muscadins of Paris.”


Byron: Don Juan, viii. 124.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Mumping Day
Munchausen (Baron)
Mundane Egg (The)
Mundilfori
Mundungus
Munera
Munkar and Nakir
Munnin
Muntabur [Mount Tabor]
Murad
Muscadins of Paris
Muscular Christianity
Muses
Museum
Mushroom (an archaic form is mushrump)
Music
Music
Music of the Spheres
Musical Notation
Musical Small - coal Man (The)
Musicians