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Paʹvan or Pavin

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Every pavan has its galliard (Spanish). Every sage has his moments of folly. Every white must have its black, and every sweet its sour. The pavan was a stately Spanish dance, in which the ladies and gentlemen stalked like peacocks (Latin, pavoʹnes), the gentlemen with their long robes of office, and the ladies with trains like peacocksʹ tails. The pavan, like the minuet, ended with a quick movement called the galliard, a sort of gavotʹte.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Paul the Hermit (St.)
Paul of the Cross
Paul’s Man (A)
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