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Sam

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Uncle Sam. The United States Government. Mr. Frost tells us that the inspectors of Elbert Anderson’s store on the Hudson were Ebenezer Wilson and his uncle Samuel Wilson, the latter of whom superintended in person the workmen, and went by the name of “Uncle Sam.” The stores were marked E.A.—U.S. (Elbert Anderson, United States). and one of the employers, being asked the meaning, said U.S. stood for “Uncle Sam.” The joke took, and in the War of Independence the men carried it with them, and it became stereotyped.

To stand Sam. To be made to pay the reckoning. This is an Americanism, and arose from the letters U.S. on the knapsacks of the soldiers. The government of Uncle Sam has to pay, or “stand Sam” for all. (See above.)

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Salt in Beer
Salt in a Coffin
Salt Losing its Savour
Salt on His Tail (Lay)
Saltarello
Saltpetre (French, saltpetre)
Salute
Salutations
Salve
Salve
Sam
Sam Weller
Samael
Samanides
Samaria
Samaritan
Sambo
Samedi (French)
Samian
Samian Letter (The)
Samian Sage (The)

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(6) Giants of Real Life
Nunky pay for all
Stand Sam (To)
Uncle Sam