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Scourge of God

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(1) Attila, king of the Huns. A. P. Stanley says the term was first applied to Attila in the Hungarian Chronicles. In Isidore’s Chronicle the Huns are called Virga Dei. (*, 434–453.)

(2) Genʹseric, king of the Vandals, who went about like a destroying angel “against all those who had, in his opinion, incurred the wrath of God.” (Probably the word Godegesal (Gothgesal, God-given) was purposely twisted into God-gesil (God’s scourge) by those who hated him, because he was an Arian. God-gesal (or Deodaʹtus) was the common title of the contemporary kings, like our Dei Gratiâ. (*, 429–477.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Scotch Pint (A)
Scotch Pound (A)
Scotch Shilling
Scotia
Scotists
Scotland
Scotland Yard (London)
Scott
Scotus (Duns)
Scourge of Christians
Scourge of God
Scourge of Princes
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Scowerers
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Scrape an Acquaintance (To)
Scratch
Scratch (A)
Scratch Cradle
Scratch Crew (A)
Scratch Eleven (A)