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Scriptoʹrēs Tres [the three writers]

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Meaning Richard of Cirencester, Gildas Badonʹicus, and Nennius of Bangor. Julius Bertram, professor of English at Copenhagen, professed to have discovered the first of these treatises in 1747, in the royal library of that city. Its subject is De Situ Britanniæ, and in 1757 he published it along with the two other treatises, calling the whole The Three Writers on the Ancient History of the British Nations. Bertram’s forgery was completely exposed by J. E. Mayor, in his preface to Ricardi de Cirencestria Speculum Historiale. (See Sanchoniatho.)

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Screw (A)
Screw Loose (A)
Screw Plot (The)
Screwed
Screwed on Right
Scribe
Scriblerus (Martinus)
Scrimmage
Scripto rēs Decem
Scriptorēs Quinque
Scriptorēs Tres [the three writers]
Scriptorium
Scriptures
Scudamore (Sir)
Scudding under Bare Poles
Scullabogue Massacre
Sculls
Sculpture
Scutch
Scuttle
Scuttle Out (To)