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Seʹnnight

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A week; seven nights. Fortʹnight, fourteen nights. These words are relics of the ancient Celtic custom of beginning the day at sunset, a custom observed by the ancient Greeks, Babylonians, Persians, Syrians, and Jews, and by the modern representatives of these people. In Gen. i. we always find the evening precedes the morning; as, “The evening and the morning were the first day,” etc.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Sell
Selling Race (A)
Selling the Pass
Seltzer Water
Semiramis of the North
Senanus. (St.)
Seneca
Senior Optime
Sennacherib
Sennight
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